New Zealand Waters,Barbara Haviland

New Zealand Waters

by Barbara Haviland in Landscapes

This painting is done in oils on a canvas.

I had some reference photos from New Zealand.I watched a video from the area and then painted.

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The history of New Zealand dates back approximately 700 years to when it was discovered and settled by Polynesians, who developed a distinct Māori culture. Like other Pacific cultures, Māori society was centred on kinship links and connection with the land but, unlike them, it was adapted to a cool, temperate environment rather than a warm, tropical one.

The first European explorer known to sight New Zealand was Dutch navigator Abel Tasman on 13 December 1642.[1] He explored and charted the coastline but never landed. Captain James Cook, who reached New Zealand in October 1769 on the first of his three voyages, was the first European explorer to circumnavigate and map New Zealand.[2]

From the late 18th century, the country was regularly visited by explorers and other sailors, missionaries, traders and adventurers. In 1840 the Treaty of Waitangi was signed between the British Crown and various Māori chiefs, bringing New Zealand into the British Empire and giving Māori the same rights as British subjects. However, disputes over the differing translations of the Treaty and settler desire to acquire land from Māori led to the New Zealand Wars from 1843.Posted on November 15, 2019. Share on FacebookTwitter or Pinterest.

Poinsettia, Barbara Haviland

Poinsettia, red flower

by Barbara Haviland in Miscellaneous

I did this from a plant someone gave me. The painting can hang either way and is framed. Available here on my website

http://BarbaraHavilandArt.com

Euphorbia pulcherrima is a shrub or small tree, typically reaching a height of 0.6–4 metres (2–13 ft). The plant bears dark green dentate leaves that measure 7–16 centimetres (2.8–6.3 in) in length. The colored bracts—which are most often flaming red but can be orange, pale green, cream, pink, white, or marbled—are often mistaken for flower petals because of their groupings and colors, but are actually leaves.[5][6] The colors of the bracts are created through photoperiodism, meaning that they require darkness (12 hours at a time for at least five days in a row) to change color. At the same time, the plants require abundant light during the day for the brightest color.[7]

The flowers of the poinsettia are unassuming and do not attract pollinators. They are grouped within small yellow structures found in the center of each leaf bunch, and are called cyathia.[8]Posted on November 12, 2019. Share on FacebookTwitter or Pinterest.

McKinney Falls Plein Air,Barbara Haviland

McKinney Falls by Barbara Haviland
BarbaraHavilandArt.com

I did this painting and this was my first plein air painting. I had such fun and it was  eye-opening. Available here. It is a lovely place.

McKinney Falls State Park is a state park in Austin, TexasUnited States at the confluence of Onion Creek and Williamson Creek. It is administered by the Texas Parks and Wildlife Department. The park opened on April 15, 1976 and is named after Thomas F. McKinney, a businessman, race horse breeder and rancher, who owned and lived on the land in the mid-to-late 19th century. The park is part of the El Camino Real de los Tejas National Historic Trail.

Flowers,Azaleas by Barbara Haviland

Azaleas,flowers

by Barbara Haviland in Flowers

I picked these azaleas and painted them for you. 

Mine don’t need watering..

Ba https://barbarahavilandart.com

An Azalea bush, is a popular flowering bush and foundation plant, with bright spring blooms.

Azaleas bushes are members of the Rhododendron family. The biggest difference between the Rhododendron plant and an Azalea plant, is the Azalea is a deciduous bush. It sheds its leaves in the fall. The Rhododendron plant is an evergreen.  In general, an Azalea bush is smaller in height, leaves, and blooms.

Most varieties of Azaleas grow two to eight feet tall. Fragrant blooms put on a show in the spring in white, lavender, bright orange, gold, red and purple colors.

Smaller in size, Azaleas are poplar potted plants as gifts for Easter and Mother’s Day. After blooms die,transplant azaleas outdoors.

Silver Teapot and Orange,Barbara Haviland

Silver Teapot and Orange, Still Life,oil painting

by Barbara Haviland in Still Life

Silver Teapot and Orange was setup in my studio and painted from life. It is done in oils and has a limited palette.

I love to do still life paintings and you learn so much.  This one is available  here for you

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still life (plural: still lifes) is a work of art depicting mostly inanimate subject matter, typically commonplace objects which are either natural (food, flowers, dead animals, plants, rocks, shells, etc.) or man-made (drinking glasses, books, vases, jewelry, coins, pipes, etc.).[1]

With origins in the Middle Ages and Ancient Greco-Roman art, still-life painting emerged as a distinct genre and professional specialization in Western painting by the late 16th century, and has remained significant since then. One advantage of the still-life artform is that it allows an artist a lot of freedom to experiment with the arrangement of elements within a composition of a painting. Still life, as a particular genre, began with Netherlandish painting of the 16th and 17th centuries, and the English term still life derives from the Dutch word stilleven. Early still-life paintings, particularly before 1700, often contained religious and allegorical symbolism relating to the objects depicted. Later still-life works are produced with a variety of media and technology, such as found objects, photography, computer graphics, as well as video and sound.

Our Backyard,landscape in oils by Barbara Haviland

Our Backyard, landscape in oils

by Barbara Haviland in Landscapes

Our Backyard is done in oils on a cradled birch panel that measures 14″ x 11″ . No need to frame unless you want to. The sun was streaking thru the pine trees and was just beautiful.  The painting is signed by the artist Barbara Haviland

Available to purchase here on my web site.

Stellar Jay,bird by Barbara Haviland

Stellar Jay is a bird I saw in Montana. Beautiful  colors.
The Steller’s jay (Cyanocitta stelleri) is a jay native to western North America, closely related to the blue jay (C. cristata) found in the rest of the continent, but with a black head and upper body. It is also known as the long-crested jay, mountain jay, and pine jay. It is the only crested jay west of the Rocky Mountains.
Jays breed in monogamous pairs.[7] The clutch is usually incubated entirely by the female for about 16 days.[8] The male feeds the female during this time. Though they are known to be loud, during nesting they are quiet in order to not attract attention.[9]
The nest is usually in a conifer but is sometimes built in a hollow in a tree. Similar in construction to the blue jay’s nest, it tends to be a bit larger (25 to 43 cm (9.8 to 16.9 in)), using a number of natural materials or scavenged trash, often mixed with mud. Between two and six eggs are laid during breeding season. The eggs are oval in shape with a somewhat glossy surface. The background colour of the egg shell tends to be pale variations of greenish-blue with brown- or olive-coloured speckles.
This stellar jay is available

https://BarbaraHavilandArt.com